Programme series: Life Choreographies – infrastructures for a livable life #1

04 juni, KL 14:30 - 19:00 Open arrangement

While the social sphere is under rapid changes, the livable life alters within. The programme series explore what life choreographies that emerge within today’s infrastructures of the social. Part of Choreographies of the Social.

Date: June 4, 2019
Time: 14.30–19.00
Place: Public Art Agency Sweden’s Lounge
Address: Hälsingegatan 45, Stockholm, Sweden
Participants: artists Jonas Staal, Thérèse Kristiansson/MYCKET and Dana Yahalomi/Public Movement, philosopher Samo Tomšič, and literary scholar Emily Apter.
RSVP: No later than June 3 to andria.nyberg.forshage@statenskonstrad.se

Life Choreographies – infrastructures for a livable life
While the social sphere is under rapid changes, the livable life alters within. The programme series explore what life choreographies that emerge within today’s infrastructures of the social. Part of Choreographies of the Social on three occasions, and includes performance, film screenings and conversations that develops further the questions from which the project departs.

Production: Life Choreographies – infrastructures for a livable life is developed by Frida Sandström in memoriam of Alina Popa and in collaboration with Annika Enqvist, Elena Jarl and Edi Muka/Public Art Council Sweden and is part of the public program of the project Choreographies of the Social. The programme series continues in Stockholm on 15 and 21 August 2019. Language: English.

PROGRAMME JUNE 4, 2019

Life Choreographies – infrastructures for a livable life

14.30 Gathering and refreshments

14.45 Edi Muka introduces the project Choregraphies of the Social and Frida Sandström presents the program of today: Life Choreographies – infrastructures for a livable life

15.00 Three artists participating in the project Choregraphies of the Social discuss what kind of new ’life choreographies’ we need today: Jonas Staal, Thérèse Kristiansson/MYCKET and Dana
Yahalomi/Public Movement (this slot includes a 10-minute pause).

16.20 Panel conversation on collective practices with Jonas Staal, Thérèse Kristiansson/MYCKET and Dana Yahalomi/Public Movement. Moderated by Frida Sandström.

16.50 Pause

17.00 Samo Tomšič, lecture “Biology” and the Problematic of the Drive

17.30 Emily Apter, lecture: Micropolitics and Ecosophy

18.00 Conversation between Samo Tomšič and Emily Apter: Micropolitics and life drives. Moderated by Frida Sandström.

18.30 Concluding gathering with drinks in the studio of Public Art Council Sweden, Gävlegatan 3 in Stockholm.

Throughout the 20th and the 21st century, the social sphere has changed. The planetary crisis is a crisis of the Anthropocene — a humanitarian crisis, traced today to a crisis of the social. As affective exchange through appearance is not only a private matter in a public sphere but the main labour on a contemporary market, the social sedimentation of the public sphere disintegrates. Unlike from the last century, participation today is both an asset and the imperative for life.
Last year, the recently passed away performer and writer Alia Popa stated that we need to develop new “life choreographies”. Taking her words literally, we ask which these might be, while simultaneously asking who “we” are — entering what Gigi Argyropoulou describes as “a precarious process of constant re-definition”. Contemporary society is saturated with such a precarity, where social relations are at constant work. It is from these processes that the individual comes into being. But together with rapid changes in communication, the constitution of the individual alters alike.
Today, we self-manage the social before sharing it, which, according to philosopher Jason Reed, corrupts of the very process of individuation. This causes an erosion of human self-understanding and, in the long term, of humanitarian beliefs. What life choreographies are needed? What possible infrastructures of the social are there to re-awake, reclaim, or renovate? Different from individual needs, these structures are shared. As “an unstated residue of collective life”, they take shape as what Lauren Berlant calls “affective commons” emerging in multiple directions and times. Departing from such a heterotopia, how do we operate within it?

This is the opening session for Choreographies of the Social, a set of artistic and discursive interventions that explores relations and affinities from which forms of the social appear and re-assemble. Invited artists construct spaces that support or trigger alliances where interdependencies between individuals and groups are put to the test.

Find more information about the project Choreographies of the Social here.

Sources:
[1]”The name “Life Programming” poses questions related to the recent boom of performance programming at contemporary art museums, and investigates how this type of art dealing with the immateriality of immateriality can interfere with the “live programming” of visual arts. It is also an occasion to think of the precept “art as life/life as art” now that it is clear, unlike it was in the 1960s when the enthusiasm for happenings opened a new chapter in art history, that “life” itself is already captured by the neoliberal apparatus, and that to make life art implies new life choreographies.”
[2]Alina Popa (2019). Art After Cantemir. e-flux Journal 98, https://www.e-flux.com/journal/98/256499/art-after-cantemir/ (tillgång 16.03.2019)
Gigi Argyropoulou. ”Critical Performance Spaces: Participation and Anti-Austerity Protests in Athens”, P[art]icipatory Urbanisms, http://www.part-urbs.com/anthology/critical_performance_spaces (Tillgång 16.03.2019)
[3]Jason Read. (2016). ”The Individuation of the Commons”, COMMONS/UNDERCOMMONS in art, education, work…, TkH, Journal for Performing Arts Theory, 23, s. 26.
[4]Jason Read. (2016). ”The Individuation of the Commons”, s. 29.
[5]Jordan Greenwald and Lauren Berlant. (2012). ”Affect in the End Times: A Conversation with Lauren Berlant Conversation with Lauren Berlant”. Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences, 20:2, s. 77.

[6]”The name ‘Life Programming’ poses questions related to the recent boom of performance programming at contemporary art museums, and investigates how this type of art dealing with the immateriality of immateriality can interfere with the “live programming” of visual arts. It is also an occasion to think of the precept ‘art as life / life as art’ now that it is clear, unlike it was in the 1960s when the enthusiasm for happenings opened a new chapter in art history, that ‘life’ itself is already captured by the neoliberal apparatus, and that to make life art implies new life choreographies.” Alina Popa (2019). Art After Cantemir. e-flux Journal 98, https://www.e-flux.com/journal/98/256499/art-after-cantemir/ (access 16.03.2019)

[7]Gigi Argyropoulou. “Critical Performance Spaces: Participation and Anti-Austerity Protests in Athens”, P[art]icipatory Urbanisms, http://www.part-urbs.com/anthology/critical_performance_spaces (Access 16.03.2019)